Uh-oh, Pt. 4: The IGC is off the reservation

AP:
Iraq’s Governing Council demanded an immediate ceasefire across the country and a halt to collective punishment Saturday in a sign of a split between U.S.-picked Iraqi leaders and U.S. administrators over military operations.
One IGC member resigns, another threatens to after meeting with Moqtar al-Sadr. Human Rights Minister resigns.
I’d say this is half-way between an “uh-oh” and an “oh, sh!t!”

BAGHDAD (AP) – Iraq’s Governing Council demanded an immediate ceasefire across the country and a halt to collective punishment Saturday in a sign of a split between U.S.-picked Iraqi leaders and U.S. administrators over military operations.

One IGC member resigns, another threatens to after meeting with Moqtar al-Sadr. Human Rights Minister resigns.

I’d say this is half-way between an “uh-oh” and an “oh, sh!t!”

Query: Assuming the handover to Iraqi sovereignty goes through as planned on June 30, what happens if the IGC, then the sovereign government of Iraq, orders a cease-fire rather than just voting a resolution in favor of a cease-fire, or invites the United States to pack up and leave?

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com