The provenance of the “dreck” motion

The “dreck” motion:
— Is real, despite my doubts.
— Was written in Boston, despite the doubts of one of my New York readers.
— Was written by a non-Jew, as I guessed.
— Turns out to be from the losing side of an interesting case.

The “dreck” motion:

— Is real, despite my doubts.

— Was written in Boston, despite the doubts of one of my New York readers.

— Was written by a non-Jew, as I guessed.

— Turns out to be from the losing side of an interesting case.

My friend Lowry Heussler, who practices real estate law in Boston, writes:

The Santiago motion was filed by Rob Doyle’s firm in Boston. I saw it with my own eyes, endorsed by the judge.

It was a lead paint poisoning case in which the plaintiff tried to hold the manufacturers of lead-based paint responsible for lead-poisoned children, many of whom suffered permanent brain damage. It was an ambitious case and the defendants, funded by the chemical industry groups, fought hard and won. Too bad. At present, the cost of removing lead from rental property in the oorest parts of Boston falls to small owner-occupants of multi-family dwellings, who can least afford it.

The plaintiff’s lawyers were mostly all Jewish and the insurance defense bar was (and remains) controlled by the Irish mafia here in the land of the bean and the cod. I’m pretty sure this case was before Judge Tauro. There was a suspicion by the plaintiff’s lawyers that some anti-Semitism was infecting the case (shocked, I am shocked) and this was a gentle way of addressing it. The funny part is that this motion was written by a non-Jew in Rob’s office who found a copy of the “Joys of Yiddish.”

The motion closed with “Oy veh” over the lawyers’ signatures instead of the customary “MONICA SANTIAGO, by her attorneys…”

Judge Tauro allowed the motion with a single sentence stating that any further use of profanity would be treated as contempt.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com