The killer 10-second spot

“I guess Mitt Romney doesn’t think much of people like us. Well, that’s OK: we don’t think much of people like him.”

What I don’t know about political advertising would fill a library, so this is submitted to the judgement of those who know more:

A series of a dozen or so virtually identical spots, varying the speaker (and in some cases the phrasing, to match). In each case, the speaker, working hard at something – manual labor, schoolbooks, child care – says, “I guess Mitt Romney doesn’t think much of people like us. Well, that’s OK: we don’t think much of people like him.”

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

2 thoughts on “The killer 10-second spot”

  1. Don’t forget the serving military.
    Another attack is: who are the real moochers? Say what you like about Ayn’s Rand’s sociopathic fantasies, her heroes actually make or run stuff: steel and railroad moguls, engineers, architects. Romney’s style of finance capitalism is purely parasitic. The strongest defence you can make is that Romney’s Bain Capital and its sibs provide a necessary Social Darwinist service to capitalism as predators of weak and struggling firms. But it can’t be denied that they make their money by exploiting loopholes in the tax code to feast on assets built by others.

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