Ouch!

Even the Washington Post, which has converted itself into a mostly Republican paper over the past several years, can’t stomach the Bush budget:

“… a masterpiece of disingenuous blame-shifting, dishonest budgeting and irresponsible governing…this isn’t credible … a problem far more serious than this administration acknowledges…having presided over record deficits, the administration now wants to claim credit if it manages to cut the bloated number in half… The goal shouldn’t be to cut the deficit in half; it should be to remedy the gap between what the government is spending and what it is taking in. To keep running up these deficits is to stick future generations with a tab they won’t be able to afford… a mirage…fuzzy math…distortion…reckless…”

As far as I can tell, no one not actually on the Bush payroll is even trying to defend this mess. [Update: Even Bruce Bartlett at National Review is poking holes in the math.] Perhaps some Congressional advocate of fiscal sanity could propose a resolution sending the budget back to the President and asking him to present an honest one instead. I repeat: this is a character issue.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

2 thoughts on “Ouch!”

  1. The Character of Our Leaders, Part III

    So if policies for alleviating poverty are an important measuring stick of a politician's character (Part II), how should we assess George Bush's policies in this area, and what judgments can we reach? First things first. An election season is

  2. The Character of Our Leaders, Part III

    So if policies for alleviating poverty are an important measuring stick of a politician’s character (Part II), how should we assess George Bush’s policies in this area, and what judgments can we reach? First things first. An election season is

Comments are closed.