Moral clarity Dep’t

Which Presidential candidate “does not condone torture” but refuses to say that, e.g., waterboarding, is torture?

Can you guess who X is in this passage?

X was similarly vague about how X would handle special interrogation methods used by the CIA. X said that while X does not condone torture, so much has been kept secret that X would not know unless elected what other extreme measures interrogators are using, and therefore could not say whether X would change or continue existing policies.

“It is not clear yet exactly what this administration is or isn’t doing. We’re getting all kinds of mixed messages,” X said. “I don’t think we’ll know the truth until we have a new president. I think [until] you can get in there and actually bore into what’s been going on, you’re not going to know.”

Go ahead, guess. No fair peeking, now.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com