Jon Stewart on Bush’s job description

The funniest political commentary I’ve seen in years.

If your biggest problem in life is that you spend too much time laughing hysterically when you ought to be working, you shouldn’t watch this Daily Show clip.

Otherwise, you should.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

4 thoughts on “Jon Stewart on Bush’s job description”

  1. Two observations:
    1. Jon Stewart is wonderful.
    2. So many of Bush's comments are about process and appearance, rather than substance. Maybe his Harvard MBA training had a perverse effect. Maybe it's too much time spent with Karl Rove.
    Is there any doubt that this is our worst president ever?

  2. Our poor President can't win for losing. If "The job of the president is X" was a standard part of his speeches, The Daily Show would string together clips of him repeating the same phrase over and over and over.
    So the guy mixes it up and comes up with new "my job is…" descriptions, only so some TDS intern can comb through TiVo'd speeches and assemble this hatchet job.
    Did you stick around til the end of the show? There were more that they couldn't fit in the main segment.

  3. Nice collection of characteristically vacuous Bush clips, but Stewart's commentry was almost as vacuous.
    I'm a supporter of Jon Stewart, but not a fan.

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