Implementation analysis

Yes, schoolchildren should know about the Bible. But how likely is it that we’ll be able to keep Bible class from turning into a little fundamentalist madrassa, especially in the places where “putting God back in the schools” has the greatest political appeal?

In principle, I’m in favor of having schoolchildren read the Bible, and, more generally, study about religion. And in principle, that’s not a politically conservative stance. How are students supposed to understand Martin Luther King without understanding Martin Luther?

In practice, though, how likely is it that we’ll be able to keep “Bible classes” from turning into little fundamentalist madrassas , especially in the places where “putting God back in the schools” has the greatest political appeal?

And no, I don’t know what to do about it, either.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com