Hardball

Arizona politics is just as rough as “Chicago politics.” People get killed.
Don Bolles, for example, the reporter who was killed on the orders of mob boss Kemper Marley.
Marley’s convicted-felon business partner, Jim Hensley, the man Marley set up with the Budweiser distributorship for Arizona, later sponsored the political career of his son-in-law, John McCain.
Glass houses. Stones. Let’s keep this polite.

The McCain campaign might want to be careful as to what it says about “Chicago politics.” (Aside from the fact that its ad on the topic is a pack of lies.)

Someone might want to start asking questions about the Republican politics of Arizona, and its ties to organized crime. Questions, for example, about Don Bolles.

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And about how Don Bolles died.

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And about Kemper Marley, the man who ordered Don Bolles killed.

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And about James W. Hensley, the convicted felon who was Kemper Marley’s business partner, and whom Marley set up with the Budweiser distributorship for Arizona.

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And about the man whose only private-sector job was working for Hensley, and who got his start in Arizona politics as Hensley’s protégé, running his first campaign for office largely with Hensley’s money. The one who calls Hensley “a role model.” Can’t remember his name right now.

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So let’s keep this polite.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com