One of the two major parties is seriously sucking wind

… and it ain’t the Democrats

… and it ain’t the Democrats:

Oh, yeah, and the rump of the Republican Party holds an increasingly odd set of views.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

5 thoughts on “One of the two major parties is seriously sucking wind”

  1. This may be a local thing, and it certainly only represents my limited circles, but here in southwest Ohio, all the Independents I know are really very loyal Republicans who think calling themselves Independents is cool. So I'm not sure I find this chart all that reassuring.

  2. This may be a local thing, and it certainly only represents my limited circles, but here in southwest Ohio, all the Independents I know are really very loyal Republicans who think calling themselves Independents is cool. So I’m not sure I find this chart all that reassuring.

    I have the same experience with people whose (stated) voting patterns trend to straight-ticket Democratic. In Chicago.

  3. I really liked this piece. It's always good to know how various individuals think about the issues.

    The most disturbing part was when they reported on the size of the Glenn Beck crowd:

    "The conservative Republican base represents almost one-in-five voters in the electorate, and nearly two out of every three self-identified Republicans."

    On the other hand…

    "Even after a description of the health care reform plan in our recent polling, these conservative Republican base voters reject it by a 59-point margin, with nearly two-thirds (64 percent) strongly opposed to reform (77 percent total opposed)."

    They managed to get nearly a quarter of the Beck crowd to say they were unsure or in favor of health care reform after it was properly explained to them?

  4. These people felt connected to the mainstream under Bush: now, suddenly, they feel marginalized–estranged from America. That it seemed to happen so fast is disorienting. Perhaps this is good news in terms of electoral politics but there is real danger here: there are zealots among them.

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