What are they hiding?

Scott McClellan promises reporters a list of Jack Abramoff’s meetings at the White House. The White House prepares the list. McClellan then refuses to show it to reporters. Do you think there might be something embarrassing there? Something named “Rove,” for instance?

Scott McClellan promises reporters a list of Jack Abramoff’s meetings at the White House. The White House prepares the list. McClellan then refuses to show it to reporters. Do you think there might be something embarrassing there? Something named “Rove,” for instance?

I’d say it’s resolution-of-inquiry time.

Update McClellan says Bush only met with Abramoff at a couple of Hannukah parties. That’s not what Abramoff’s own billing records show. And Think Progress has a little nugget I haven’t seen elsewhere: Abramoff was officially a member of the Bush transition team, working on the Interior Department.

White House Silent on Abramoff Meetings

By NEDRA PICKLER, Associated Press Writer

Tue Jan 17, 9:24 PM ET

WASHINGTON – The White House is refusing to reveal details of tainted lobbyist Jack Abramoff’s visits with President Bush’s staff.

Abramoff had “a few staff-level meetings” at the Bush White House, presidential spokesman Scott McClellan said Tuesday. But he would not say with whom Abramoff met, which interests he was representing or how he got access to the White House.

Since Abramoff pleaded guilty two weeks ago to conspiracy, mail fraud and tax evasion charges in an influence-peddling scandal, McClellan has told reporters he was checking into Abramoff’s meetings. “I’m making sure that I have a thorough report back to you on that,” he said in his press briefing Jan. 5. “And I’ll get that to you, hopefully very soon.”

McClellan said Tuesday that he checked on it at reporters’ requests, but wouldn’t discuss the private staff-level meetings. “We are not going to engage in a fishing expedition,” he said.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, along with three other Democratic senators, wrote Bush a letter Tuesday asking for an accounting of Abramoff’s personal contacts with Bush administration officials and acts that may have been undertaken at his request. “The American people need to be assured that the White House is not for sale,” they wrote.

McClellan has said Abramoff attended three Hanukkah receptions at the White House, but corrected himself Tuesday to say there were only two — in 2001 and 2002.

McClellan said Bush does not know Abramoff personally, although it’s possible the two met at the holiday receptions.

Abramoff was one of Bush’s top fundraisers, having brought in at least $100,000 for the Bush-Cheney ’04 re-election campaign and earning the honorary title “pioneer.” The campaign took $6,000 of the contributions — which came directly from Abramoff, his wife and one of the Indian tribes he represented — and donated it to the American Heart Association. But the campaign has not returned the rest of the money Abramoff raised.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com