Thriller Up North

The friend with whom my family and I are staying is a BBC science reporter. She once went to a near-Arctic field station with some other science journalists, curious about how researchers spend their time in such a cold, harsh and mosquito-ridden environment. See for yourself.

Author: Keith Humphreys

Keith Humphreys is the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of Psychiatry at Stanford University and an Honorary Professor of Psychiatry at Kings College Lonon. His research, teaching and writing have focused on addictive disorders, self-help organizations (e.g., breast cancer support groups, Alcoholics Anonymous), evaluation research methods, and public policy related to health care, mental illness, veterans, drugs, crime and correctional systems. Professor Humphreys' over 300 scholarly articles, monographs and books have been cited over ten thousand times by scientific colleagues. He is a regular contributor to Washington Post and has also written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Monthly, San Francisco Chronicle, The Guardian (UK), The Telegraph (UK), Times Higher Education (UK), Crossbow (UK) and other media outlets.

5 thoughts on “Thriller Up North”

  1. It seems funny to talk about giant mosquitos in the Arctic, but it’s definitely true. They are a vital link in the food chain that supports spawning salmon, who in turn support the grizzly bears.

    BTW, Toolik Firld Station is two degrees north of the Arctic circle, so I wonder about calling it “near-Arctic.” How far north do you have to go to be “Arctic?”

  2. So this is why scientists continue to write papers about global warming … so that they can get fat grants to go to exotic, fun destinations life this one.

  3. “She once went to a near-Arctic field station with some other science journalists, curious about how researchers spend their time in such a cold, harsh and mosquito-ridden environment.”
    Why bother? Your friend faces innumeracy and and scientific ignorance every day in the BBC.

    1. @James: Why bother? Your friend faces innumeracy and and scientific ignorance every day in the BBC

      This is well over the mark. No denying the BBC bungles scientific coverage at times, but you are painting with too broad a brush — they have some truly outstanding people in their science unit.

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