Killing more trees

My latest on community corrections, in the journal Criminology and Public Policy.

The latest issue of Criminology and Public Policy has a paper on justice reinvestment by Todd Clear and a response from me that will surprise no one: I argue that the best way to generate prison savings is with better community supervision, and that therefore the best form of justice reinvestment is letting out prisoners and plowing some of the money back into probation and parole.

If the first page whets your appetite and you don’t have access, I’ll happily send out .pdfs of the full text on request to [mylastname] [at] [ucla] [dot] [eee-dee-you].

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

2 thoughts on “Killing more trees”

  1. “If the first page whets your appetite and you don’t have access, I’ll happily send out .pdfs of the full text on request to [mylastname] [at] [ucla] [dot] [eee-dee-you].”

    Not to criticize you, Mark, but why is a statement like this necessary? Why don’t you have this (and all) your PDFs just listed on your CV page on your UCLA web page? If the journal demands copyright, why are you and UC still dealing with them — start a civilized journal that doesn’t have such ridiculous and user-hostile policies.

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