60 votes

Amazingly, Joe Lieberman decided against another double-cross.  And the Ayes have it.

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com

4 thoughts on “60 votes”

  1. Well, it's a step. Mind you, we're not out of the frying pan yet; the bill has to go through reconciliation with the House version, and then pass both chambers. You can bet that the Republicans will be screaming quite a bit throughout the whole process.

    My guess is that as it gets implemented (assuming it finally passes), we'll probably have a whole host of bills ironing out the issues that arise with it, until we get something hopefully almost universal and distinctively American. That's what happened with Social Security, and with both Medicare and Medicaid.

    One comfort for us liberals is that historically, health care programs here and abroad tend to build up a strong base of support, to the point where abolishing or completely gutting them is unthinkable. Witness what happened with Medicare here, or the universal health care system in Switzerland – the latter passed by a narrow vote just a few years back, but now gutting it is unthinkable.

  2. I keep thinking that maybe ol' Joe is suffering from dementia and should be put out to pasture. But then, that would mean he's been non compos mentis for a long time. Nope, I guess he really is just greedy and unprincipled, but loyal to those who have bought him.

  3. Oh, no, he's very compos mentis; I wish that he weren't, because then he'd literally sling feces on the floor of the Senate and be removed from office (well, probably not; his staff would just run him as a puppet).

    Question – the NYT cover story mentioned 4 more fillibusterable votes before it goes to the House-Senate committee. Does anybody know anything about that?

  4. I keep thinking that maybe ol’ Joe is suffering from dementia and should be put out to pasture. But then, that would mean he’s been non compos mentis for a long time. Nope, I guess he really is just greedy and unprincipled, but loyal to those who have bought him.

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