Her body, her self

Terri Schiavo shouldn’t be “given back to her parents” because she isn’t property.

Lindsay Beyerstein provides some suggestions about the right liberal narrative for the Terri Schiavo case. Every word is worth reading, but I was particularly taken with the paragraph that perfectly nailed the “If Terri’s parents want to keep her alive, why not give her back to them?” line featured, e.g., in the lead editorial in today’s Wall Street Journal:

Florida isn’t a slave state. It is supremely offensive to suggest that Michael Schiavo should give Terri back to her parents. He’s not Terri’s owner, he’s her husband and her guardian. There is clear and convincing evidence that Terri didn’t want a tube. There is no evidence that she’d want to be intubated, divorced, and shipped home to mommy, daddy and their creepy cabal of quacks and itinerant friars. Notice the subtext: Terri’s desire to control her own body doesn’t matter, nice girls sacrifice their dignity to spare the feelings of others.

That rates, I believe, at least one “ouch,” one “indeed,” and one “heh.”

Author: Mark Kleiman

Professor of Public Policy at the NYU Marron Institute for Urban Management and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis. Teaches about the methods of policy analysis about drug abuse control and crime control policy, working out the implications of two principles: that swift and certain sanctions don't have to be severe to be effective, and that well-designed threats usually don't have to be carried out. Books: Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment (Princeton, 2009; named one of the "books of the year" by The Economist Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results (Basic, 1993) Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control (Greenwood, 1989) UCLA Homepage Curriculum Vitae Contact: Markarkleiman-at-gmail.com